Dokter Blog: from the desk of Rahajeng Tunjungputri

Medicine et cetera by @ajengmd

Investing in young Indonesian Researchers

Last week the article I submitted for The Jakarta Post was published on 22 August 2010. The issue was something dear to my life and work: that we need more young Indonesian researchers; and to accomplish that we need to invest in them.

The article was inspired by my experience with a mentor. He has always taken the time and energy to foster new generations of clinician-scientists. I recently realized, that to “produce” excellent scientists in Indonesia, a senior researcher has to be willing to make an investment. The mentor will have to invest his or her time, energy, patience and guidance, for years, in his or her students. There is no instant process of turning an average student into a leading scientist. Everyone must take part in investing in Indonesian young researchers.

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2010/08/22/investing-young-indonesian-researchers.html

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2nd International Seminar and Workshop on Fragile X, Autism, and Related Disorders

Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disabilities (ID). The clinical signs are intellectual disabilities, hyperactive, autism, psychoneurologic disorders, and macroorchidism (testes enlargement) in male. The common affected is in males; however, carrier female could have a mild intellectual disability such as learning difficulties, without other symptoms. Some clinically normal males (Normal Transmitting Males) are known to carry and transmit the fragile X mutation to their daughter. In advance age, carriers of FXS could develop Fragile-X-Associated Tremor Ataxia (FXTAS), a neurodegenerative disorder.

Within the framework of long collaboration with the Medical Investigation of Neurodevelopmental Disorders (MIND) Institute, UC Davis, USA; Faculty of Medicine Diponegoro University (FMDU) Semarang Indonesia will organize a 2nd International workshop on Fragile X Syndrome, Autism and Related Disorders. This workshop comprises also a talk show session, which will present some cases of autism and ID patients.
(Excerpt taken from the seminar’s leaflet)
The event will take place in Semarang, 7 August 2010. Please refer to the leaflet below (downloadable) and register for your ensured participation in the event.
Regards,
Rahajeng

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Twittering medicine and science

My relationship with twitter has not been the most mutual, but when I got to the ground zero of boredom I came back to do some twittering around (by now if you haven’t realized what twitter is, you should just let Uncle Google explain). Anyway, due to my enormous capacity and stamina to read and surf the net, I found so many new science writers and medical writers on twitter. OK reading journal articles are exhausting after a while, but pop science is always somewhat lighter and more fun to read (and good to share with students in the class). So I started going through the tweets, and found interesting articles whether in journals (my fave: Nature and NEJM) or on science blogs (I always love to see how these science writers look like: a nerdy nerd/mad scientist or a hippie in the mad world of science).

I’m sorry, but I belong in this universe where scientific advances are entertainment, writers are celebrities, scientists are even more famous celebrities, and science writers are rock-stars (and this last category includes scientists who write as well). Seriously.

Just the other day, I read this article on Nature, http://bit.ly/aa72f4 and decided to follow the respected writer, Erika Check Hayden on twitter. I loved the Mandelbrot set analogy she used. I followed her, tweet her, and nearly fainted of excitement when she responded back to my tweet. I. Am. Such. A. Nerd. (Please refer back to my previous statement: science writers are rockstars!). And afterwards I followed several other science writers/bloggers and always being amused of how you can have mutual contact via twitter when it comes to pop science and writing (also, thanks to Dr.Isis the Domestic and Laboratory Godess).

I think sometimes I just get tired of the intensity and seriousness of medical blogging and reading, and these pop culture in science and medicine give me new light on staying informed in a fun and relaxing way.

So thank you all twittering science writers!

* Rahajeng

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Presentation slides: Genetic Basis of Parkinson Disease and Bioethics of Genetic Research

***
Dear All,
Since we’ve been working on so many presentations in my master class of genetic counseling I thought I’d share some of our presentations for future reference.
Today we had a discussion and presentation of neurological diseases, one of them is Parkinson Disease.
I uploaded the presentations on SlideShare and for some reason the embed code doesn’t work here, so I will just direct you with a link to SlideShare website for viewing the presentation.

View more presentations from rntunjung
I hope you find this is useful 🙂
Regards,
Rahajeng

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Disclaimer

Medicine is a growing field, and information presented here is reflective of the time of posting. Please refer to your physician for direct medical consultation. My views do not reflect those of my employers. --
Regards, Rahajeng

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