Dokter Blog: from the desk of Rahajeng Tunjungputri

Medicine et cetera by @ajengmd

Trematodes presentation

The short version of the powerpoint presentation of trematodes we use for response discussion was just uploaded. This only consists selected (and most important) slides.

You can click the pic below (or click here) to see the presentation on slideshare.

There is an interesting case report on trematode infection on NEJM:

Do Hyun Park, M.D., Ph.D.
Hyun-Young Son, M.D.
University of Ulsan College of Medicine
138-736, Seoul, South Korea
dhpark@amc.seoul.kr

A 62-year-old man reported having had fatigue, fever, and cramping abdominal pain for 7 days. He also reported that he had recently eaten raw pond smelt (Hypomesus olidus). The results of liver-function tests were abnormal, showing elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase (350 IU per liter), alanine aminotransferase (352 IU per liter), alkaline phosphatase (204 IU per liter), {gamma}-glutamyltransferase (434 IU per liter), total bilirubin (6.4 mg per deciliter [109 µmol per liter]), and conjugated bilirubin (3.9 mg per deciliter [67 µmol per liter]). The white-cell count was also elevated (13,000 per cubic millimeter), and there was eosinophilia (27%). A computed tomographic scan of the abdomen showed dilatation of the common bile duct without definite filling defects. Given our concern that the patient might have acute cholangitis, a duodenoscopy was performed, and a prominent major papilla was discovered. After cannulation of the common bile duct, numerous leaf-shaped worms popped out (see video) and were subsequently identified as Clonorchis sinensis (also called Opisthorchis sinensis). The patient was given praziquantel and had a quick and uneventful recovery. The clinical manifestations of clonorchiasis tend to reflect the worm burden and the duration of infection. Clonorchis may persist in the biliary tree for decades, and prolonged infestation is associated with the development of cholangiocarcinoma. Acute cholangitis and pancreatitis are rare but important complications of C. sinensis infestation.

Good luck for your exams!
-Rahajeng-
*
Images used in the presentations are not mine, no copyright infringement intended.

Filed under: miscelaneous, , , , , , ,

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Disclaimer

Medicine is a growing field, and information presented here is reflective of the time of posting. Please refer to your physician for direct medical consultation. My views do not reflect those of my employers. --
Regards, Rahajeng

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